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Sawmill

The client sought to transform an 1980’s cedar-shingle house on a unique riverside lot at the edge of downtown Aspen into a seven-bedroom, 17,000 square foot estate.  Particularly important in this project was the need to convert a structure that lacked flow and space into a home that would welcome friends and family possibly numbering into the dozens at one time.  JS Design was intimately involved from the very beginning of the re-architecture of the core structure and the addition of a freestanding pool house and caretaker unit.  Engaging throughout the entire design process in this manner allowed the client to enjoy unique design accomplishments such as the barrel-vaulted ceiling with integrated skylight cupola in the living room and the edgy Italian style external stone façade using materials local to the Colorado area.

“The clients wanted a family home that could handle 25 kids running through it in addition to other activities at the same time,” Longbrook says.  “The existing house didn’t flow and lacked space.”  To make the layout more conductive to high-volume activity, the designer expanded the kitchen, added media and billiards areas, and compartmentalized rooms.  Garages, a freestanding pool house and caretaker unit were added as well.

Judy incorporated natural materials to create what she calls an ‘edgy Italian’ façade.  “We didn’t want it to look like a faux chateau or like it was trying to be something it’s not. By using materials you’d find in Colorado, such as stone, wood and copper, we gave the house a sense of place.”

Hillcrest

This ramshackle rental property in a fabulous location was deconstructed down to two standing walls and then completely rebuilt in neoclassic style. Working with the constraint of having to reconstruct within the existing footprint, design elements such as the introduction of vaulted ceilings allowed the living spaces to evoke more of an “apartment-in-the-city” feel. The addition of an Italian style portico to the entry and the introduction of extensive hardscaping to the yard in front of the house also created an important exterior feature that expanded the available living space in a meaningful way.

Edge Lofts

By juxtaposing styles and periods in a whimsical yet functional manner, a cold concrete-steel-and-glass high-rise loft unit was converted into an inviting antique filled “concrete cocoon”.  Custom carpets were used to graciously divide a large single open area into a set of clearly defined living spaces.  The inclusion of a faux fireplace with limestone mantel, multiple antique French chandeliers, and “ball-gown” style draperies across the expansive steel and glass windows all contributed to the softening of the hard edges of the underlying building design.

“IF classic architecture, sumptuous fabrics and a mixture of tailored furnishings and elegant antiques make for your favorite spaces, you’ll delight in Judy Longbrook’s  sophisticated interiors.”

Edge Lofts

By juxtaposing styles and periods in a whimsical yet functional manner, a cold concrete-steel-and-glass high-rise loft unit was converted into an inviting antique filled “concrete cocoon”.  Custom carpets were used to graciously divide a large single open area into a set of clearly defined living spaces.  The inclusion of a faux fireplace with limestone mantel, multiple antique French chandeliers, and “ball-gown” style draperies across the expansive steel and glass windows all contributed to the softening of the hard edges of the underlying building design.

“IF classic architecture, sumptuous fabrics and a mixture of tailored furnishings and elegant antiques make for your favorite spaces, you’ll delight in Judy Longbrook’s  sophisticated interiors.”

Deep Water Bay

The US-based client wanted to create a comfortable, familiar living environment in a foreign land for her and her family.  The project involved transforming the vast unstructured openness of an oversized multi-level apartment into more intimate, defined living spaces anchored with the familiar scale and presence of American and European furnishings and appointments.   To deliver this environment, an extensive assessment of the client’s day-to-day living habits and desires was undertaken.  That assessment was translated into an overall design philosophy for the project and was carried through into the eventual sourcing and delivery of the entire interior from the US.

“Importing all the furniture from the US, American-based interior designer, Judy Longbrook turns a spacious Deep Water Bay house into an elegant home for its new arrivals.  One of the most unusual and notable features of the house is the enormous living area.  Luckily, Judy is well versed in working with large, open spaces given her vast experience in designing lofts.”


Luxe Magazine

Sawmill

The client sought to transform an 1980’s cedar-shingle house on a unique riverside lot at the edge of downtown Aspen into a seven-bedroom, 17,000 square foot estate.  Particularly important in this project was the need to convert a structure that lacked flow and space into a home that would welcome friends and family possibly numbering into the dozens at one time.  JS Design was intimately involved from the very beginning of the re-architecture of the core structure and the addition of a freestanding pool house and caretaker unit.  Engaging throughout the entire design process in this manner allowed the client to enjoy unique design accomplishments such as the barrel-vaulted ceiling with integrated skylight cupola in the living room and the edgy Italian style external stone façade using materials local to the Colorado area.

“The clients wanted a family home that could handle 25 kids running through it in addition to other activities at the same time,” Longbrook says.  “The existing house didn’t flow and lacked space.”  To make the layout more conductive to high-volume activity, the designer expanded the kitchen, added media and billiards areas, and compartmentalized rooms.  Garages, a freestanding pool house and caretaker unit were added as well.

Judy incorporated natural materials to create what she calls an ‘edgy Italian’ façade.  “We didn’t want it to look like a faux chateau or like it was trying to be something it’s not. By using materials you’d find in Colorado, such as stone, wood and copper, we gave the house a sense of place.”

Portrait Magazine